Oct 10 2010

Hot Google Netbook Demand Opens New Possibilities

According to the google keyword tool there are approximately 33,100 searches per month for the term “Google Netbook.” Although there is no clear indication that Google will release it’s own Google netbook computer the company has spoken with netbook manufacturers about producing netbooks with the Chrome OS operating system. This begs the question though, with the current demand for Google netbooks will Google consider producing a netbook like it has cell phones?

Although it is unclear whether those searching for “google netbook” are simply looking for a netbook with google chrome OS pre-installed or a netbook produced by Google, there is clearly a demand for Google products in the netbook marketplace. Google did announce earlier this year that they do plan on releasing Chrome OS in the 4th quarter.

As the leading manufacturer of netbooks, Acer also receives 33,100 monthly searches for the term “Acer netbook.” If the leader in the market is receiving the same searches, the demand cannot be ignored. Only the future will tell if Google will one day produce its own netbooks.

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Jun 27 2010

Competion between Google Chrome OS and Microsoft Windows Heats Up

Google and Dell are in communication about Google Chrome OS and the future it plays in computing and possible installation of Google Chrome OS on a Dell netbook. Dell realizes that Chrome OS could very well offer stiff competition to Microsoft Windows and working with Google could benefit them in the next couple years as changes come to the industry.

There has been no official announcement from Dell or Google about a deal but “talks” are underway. If an agreement is reached Dell would be the third manufacturer to build a future netbook with Chrome OS. The other computer manufacturers that plan on releasing netbooks or other computers with Chrome OS are Acer and HP.

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Jun 8 2010

Acer revealed netbook with Google Chrome OS

At Computex, Acer showed off their first netbook run on Google Chrome OS.  Most analysts agree that while Acer may be the first company showcasing such a netbook, other companies will soon follow suite due to the strength and flexibility of Google Chrome OS and also because Acer is not the only company to have struck a partnership with Google. Which company will be next?

Via SEOPositive

Jun 4 2010

AMD Will Not Feature Tablet PC in Computex 2010

Many PC manufacturers will be touting tablet computers at Computex 2010, but the Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Products Group at AMD, Rick Bergman, believes that the company is in no hurry to enter this market, “AMD currently is still evaluating the tablet PC market and will wait until market demand start to appear before joining.”  AMD is more optimistic towards future growth in the netbook market and currently has no plans into expanding into the smartphone nor consumer electronics markets.

Bergman also noted growing competition from Nvidia.  In order to keep up with the competition, AMD will continue expanding its graphics technologies and launch new products including the ATI Radeon HD 5450, 5570, and 5670 graphics cards, which will target entry-level and mainstream consumer groups.  In addition, AMD has already shipped 11 million units of DirectX 11-supporting GPUs since its launch.

Instead of entering the tablet PC, smartphone, or consumer electronics markets, AMD will also focus its efforts on its netbook-based Bobcat processor, which will be released in 2011.

Via Digitimes.

Jun 1 2010

Google Tries to Phase out Windows

According to sources within Google, the search giant is currently trying to phase out the Microsoft Windows operating system on company computers in order to reduce security problems. Google and Microsoft have been rivals for some time now and the two companies have become increasingly hostile in recent months.

Google experienced attacks in China that resulted from a flaw in Microsoft’s browser, Internet Explorer. Coupled with the fact that Google has a web browser (Chrome) and is planning an operating system (Chrome OS), the move makes sense. Why should Google give Microsoft, a competitor, any more money by buying a competing operating system?

Some security analysts have said the move is not as logical as it seems. According to them, although Windows is often the target of hackers, because of this it has excellent security features that are allegedly not found in other operating systems, such as Mac OS X. By switching, Google will actually open itself up to more attacks.

I know there are not many attempted attacks on Mac OS X because not nearly as many people use it as Windows and I hope Google’s move does not increase the number of attacks on Mac. Maybe it’s time to start learning Linux…

Via PC World, image via Google.

May 25 2010

Google Enthusiasts Must Wait Longer for Chrome

Google has brought us a variety of wonders and many of their innovations synergize perfectly together to create an altogether smooth experience. One thing people are anticipating greatly is the release of Google’s Chrome OS. The Chrome OS will be intended only for netbooks, as it is a simple browser-based operating system that doesn’t demand much processing power.  Companies such as Acer are working with Google to release netbooks with the OS as soon as possible, and it is rumored that they could be releasing one as soon as June. This rumor however was denied by Acer.

Google has a lot on their plate, as Android’s success is gaining momentum. Google will need to keep its focused balanced in order for both Chrome and Android to do their best. The key for Chrome will be the apps that it will have available for the users, thus Google is focusing on having an app store up and running.

It also must be noted that Computex is just around the bend and unfortunately one thing spectators should not expect to see is the Chrome OS.  It is likely then that consumers will just have to wait until the fall to see the Chrome OS.

Via Wired

May 24 2010

Google To Steal Apple’s ‘Cult’ Status?

At Google’s developer event last week, something strange happened: the high energy present made it more like an Apple event than a Google event. Could Google be ascending in popularity and eventually achieve the cult status that Apple has held for so long?

Many people are showing support for Android, and some have suggested that this means Apple is now trying to catch up to Google. At the event, Google introduced Froyo, the updated version of Android, which got people talking. Apple needs to do something new and exciting at WWDC or it will be left behind.

The funny thing is, in this whole Apple vs. Google battle, Microsoft is left out. Apple is cool, Google is on the way to becoming cool, and Microsoft is so uncool that it’s forgotten. But if Google wants to continue being in the ascendant, it needs to deal with some major issues, such as how Android and Chrome OS will work together.

Via CNET, image via Google.

May 19 2010

Will Intel Influence the Size of Future Netbooks?

Netbooks have not been able to do too much in terms of cannibalizing notebook sales, and we have Intel to partially thank for this.  Intel has imposed a limitation on netbook screen sizes, i.e. netbooks that are powered by processors in the Atom N series have been restricted to screen sizes no larger than 10.2″.  This may change soon, as Intel may lift this restriction in the latter half of 2010, particularly with devices that are powered by the dual-core Intel Atom N550 processor.

Surprised?  I’m not.  Netbook sales have started to level off recently, so Intel is looking for a way to keep netbooks interesting.  Some consumers believe that netbooks are too small to be efficient, so by enlarging the overall size of netbooks, sales in this area of the market would potentially be much greater.

In addition, ARM-based smartbooks with screen sizes larger than 10.2″ will be coming in the near future.  Intel wants to keep ahead of its competition, so it’s loosening the restrictions on which netbook sizes their processors can support.

Of course, increasing the size of a netbook would further blur the line between such a device and a notebook, leaving us with one question… when is a netbook no longer a netbook, but instead an ultraportable or a notebook?  Check out one of our previous articles for some details.

Via Arstechnica.

May 18 2010

Rumor Denied: No Acer Chrome OS Netbook at Computex 2010

A few days ago, there was a rumor that Acer would be releasing a Chrome OS-based netbook at the upcoming Computex 2010 showcase.  Unfortunately, this rumor turns out to be just that — a rumor.  Recently, Acer has officially said that it will not be releasing such a device at Computex 2010.

Furthermore, Acer has announced that they will not be releasing any Chrome OS-based devices.  Don’t worry though, we’ll keep you posted when we hear any other juicy rumors.

Via I4U.

May 17 2010

Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 May Feature Chrome Instead of Firefox

At the most recent Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS), part of the discussion revolved around the changes that would be coming to the default applications released with the Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 software package.

One item on the list of changes is in regards to the default browser that comes with the Ubuntu software.  Instead of using Mozilla Firefox as the default web browser, Google Chrome might serve as its replacement.  Whether or not this change will happen will depend on if there is enough storage space available.

The proposition is that Chromium will be used until the software’s Alpha 3 stage, at which point further decisions regarding which will be the default browser as part of Ubuntu Netbook Edition (UNE) will be announced.

Via UbuntuHQ.

May 16 2010

Intel: Dual-Core Atom Netbooks On the Way

At the company’s investor meeting in Santa Clara, California this past week, Intel showed off a netbook that was equipped with the company’s very own Intel Atom dual-core processor.  The webcast event also showed off a new tablet computer that would be equipped with an Intel Atom chipset.

New netbooks and tablets featuring Intel chips will be displayed at Computex 2010.  According to Mooly Eden, the Vice President and General Manager of Intel’s PC Client Group, the company wants to raise the bar in netbook performance and they’re aiming to do that with the release of dual-core Atom processors.  Essentially, this technology will allow users to more efficiently run multiple applications on their netbooks at the same time.

Netbooks have been around for a while, and people are no longer willing to sacrifice their relatively poor performance (at least compared to laptops) for the added portability and convenience.   Eden says, “People are not willing to compromise anymore. We do not think about one thing, we think about several things at a time. We expect our computer to do the same thing.”

According to Intel’s CEO Paul Otellini, the netbook market is continuing to grow, so improving the performance of netbook technology is very important.

Via PCWorld.

May 14 2010

First Chrome OS Device to be an Acer Netbook

In a couple weeks — two to be exact — Taiwanese computer manufacturer Acer is rumored to be launching netbooks (and possibly other tech devices) that run on the Google Chrome OS.  The official display will take place at the Computex Taipei Show that will be held from June 1 to June 5.

It’s still uncertain what other devices the Google Chrome OS will be featured in, but Google has mentioned that smartbooks and tablets running ARM processors would be likely vehicles.  There has recently been rumors that Samsung is developing ARM-based smartbooks running Chrome.

Using an OS other than Google Android for netbooks is a good idea.  The Android OS is better suited for tablets and cell phones.  Google originally planned to release the Chrome operating system during the second half of 2010.  The rumored Acer Chrome OS-based netbook is expected to launch in June, so that’s just perfect.

Via VentureBeat and CoolTechZone.

May 13 2010

First Chrome OS Device to be Released

The first device running Chrome OS, the open source operating system by Google, is supposed to be introduced by Acer in two weeks, according to multiple sources.

Acer is supposed to show off its new device at Computex Taipei, a yearly computer and electronics show that opens on June 1. Chrome OS was designed for netbooks, smartbooks, and tablets. Acer has said previously that it would have a Chrome OS netbook ready by the middle of 2010. There currently is no word about what the device is going to be.

Other netbook manufacturers have expressed interest in working with Chrome OS, including Dell, though it said that it was still evaluating Chrome OS.

What is unclear right now is the relationship between Chrome OS and Android. Android is intended for mobile devices, like smartphones, but some companies have expressed interest in using it on tablets as well. Google co-founder Sergey Brin says that the two will eventually merge.

Via CNET, image via Google.

May 10 2010

Acer, ASUS, and HP Lead Netbook and CULV Notebook Growth in 2010

Market research company iSuppli is reporting that notebook shipments are expected to post double-digit growth in 2010.  This growth is expected because of increased shipments for netbooks and Consumer Ultra-Low Voltage (or CULV) notebooks.

Overall in 2010, 209.5 million units of notebook PCs will be shipped, which is 25.5% higher than the amount of notebooks shipped the previous year.  The netbook category itself is expected to have 34.5 million shipments in 2010, a 30% increase from the previous year.  Four years from now in 2014, netbook shipments are expected to hit a whopping 58.3 units!  CULV notebooks are expected to have 14.5 million units shipped in 2010, which is a 93% increase from last year’s 7.5 million units.

Taiwan-based netbook manufacturer Acer leads the pack in netbook shipments; it has been the market leader for two years and holds 37% of the market.  ASUS, also Taiwan-based, currently ships 5.5 million netbook units and holds 21% of the market.  Hewlett-Packard, Samsung, and Dell are third, fourth, and fifth in netbook shipments.  These top five netbook manufacturers make up 90% of the market.

Via eWeek.

May 4 2010

Internet Explorer Usage Drops

This news makes me extremely happy because I absolutely cannot stand Internet Explorer. I hope that people are realizing that there are so many great alternative browsers out there to use. According to statistics published by Net Applications, Internet Explorer use is down to about 60 percent, which is quite a change from the 80 percent it had two and a half years ago. Firefox has nearly 25 percent of the usage, Chrome has 6.7 percent, and Opera 2.3 percent.

Alternative browsers use different rendering engines from Internet Explorer’s Trident and offer a vastly improved performance. Trident does not meet the latest web standards and has very slow rendering speeds compared to Gecko, Presto, and WebKit, the rendering engines of Firefox, Opera, and Chrome/Safari, respectively.

I would highly recommend switching from Internet Explorer if you are still using it. Firefox is a great alternative (it has lots of pretty themes that you can use to customize it), as is Safari (it’s really, really fast). I have heard great things about Chrome, though I have not used it myself. And if you’re a Mac user, Camino is a great choice as well—it’s based on Gecko and integrates really well with the Mac OS. I have tried Opera in the past and I found it a bit difficult to adjust to, but it is also a good alternative to Internet Explorer.

Via AppleInsider.

Apr 22 2010

Apple Buyout of ARM Just a Rumor

A rumor originated in London this week concerning the possibility of Apple buying chip designer ARM. Such a move would be messy, pricey, and unpopular and has since been confirmed as just a rumor, as the two companies are not engaged in talks with each other.

Such an acquisition would probably cause some regulatory scrutiny. Though ARM is a small company, it licenses technology to many chipmakers such as Texas Instruments, Samsung, and Nvidia. Furthermore, if Apple owned ARM, many people would question the independence of ARM, no matter how many times Apple emphasized independence.

The acquisition would also be very expensive for Apple. Apple has about $40 billion right now, but ARM would cost up to $8 billion, which certainly is not cheap. It would be foolish for Apple to buy the company when it could just license the technology instead.

Via CNET, image via ARM.

Apr 21 2010

Google Chromium-Based Netbooks Priced at $300-$400

According to Google Chief Eric Schmidt, netbooks running on Google’s new Chromium operating system that are expected to be on sale in retail stores by the end of this year or early next year will be priced in the $300-$400 range. “Those prices are completely determined by the costs of the glass, the costs of the processor and things like that, but in our case Chrome OS and Android are free so there is no software tax associated with all of this,” Schmidt says.

Google introduced the Chrome operating system two months ago and boasted it as a lightweight, browser-based OS that could boot up in seven seconds or less.  The company has not yet revealed who they will be partnering with to manufacture their new netbooks, but Acer has said that it expects to offer about a million of these devices this year.

Google’s trying hard to get into the netbook market and is up for a fight against its competitors, namely Windows-based devices.  Guess we’ll just have to wait to see Google’s latest creation.

Via Wired.

Mar 31 2010

Google Defies Apple by Supporting Flash

Apple famously does not support Adobe Flash on its mobile devices. Steve Jobs has spoken out against Flash (the man’s insistent resistance to giving us iPhone users Flash support drives me crazy) rather strongly in the past.

However, Apple is one of the only companies that harbors such a vendetta against Flash. Apple’s recent competitor, Google, has announced that it will support Flash by bundling Adobe Flash Player with downloads of its Google Chrome browser. Chrome is used by only five percent of Internet users, but Google is a big company that has a very large presence as a search engine and as an online advertiser, so its support will be important to Adobe.

A Google spokesperson said that Flash will be integrated seamlessly into Chrome and and “truly feel like a part of the browser.”

In contrast to Google’s support of Flash, Apple has expressed support of HTML 5, which allows users to view video content even if they do not have Flash installed.

Via Wired, image via Google.

Mar 27 2010

Apple and Google CEOs Have Coffee Together

BFFs? I think not.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs and Google CEO Eric Schmidt were spotted earlier in the day having coffee together at a Palo Alto coffee shop.

Google and Apple, two companies that used to be friendly with each other, have grown increasingly competitive in recent months. The enmity comes from Google entering what is perceived as Apple’s traditional part of the market: smartphones (Android is a competitor to the iPhone OS), browsers (Google Chrome, anyone?) and even operating systems (Google’s Chrome OS will compete with Mac OS X).

Jobs and Schmidt continued their discussion until they saw a crowd growing. According to an observer, Jobs then said, “Let’s go discuss this somewhere more private.” The only other thing heard from the discussion was Jobs saying, “They’re going to see it all eventually so who cares how they get it.”

Gizmodo reported about the meeting of the two CEOs, going as far as to hire a body language analyst (bottom line: the two men were extremely uncomfortable with each other). Though it would be easier and more accurate to analyze their body language from a video rather than from just photos, the analyst concluded that Schmidt is afraid of Jobs. Such fear is perhaps inspired by Apple’s recent lawsuit against HTC.

Via Examiner, image via Gizmodo.

Mar 21 2010

Google: Viacom Secretly Uploaded Own Clips To YouTube, Asked For Subsequent Removal

Viacom’s one billion dollar case against Google over distribution of its copyrighted video on YouTube just took a turn for the worse.  Google has made the very damning accusation that Viacom actually supported in efforts to have its content put on YouTube as pirated material, only to demand from YouTube later to pull the infringing videos.  If these allegations are true, they would severely case Viacom’s legitimacy in the suit that began in March 2007 against YouTube for allowing 160,000 of Viacom’s videos to be posted.

The opening briefs of the case were released on Friday, and Google posted a scathing blog entry in the Official YouTube blog about this whole case.  The first portion of it is dedicated to the ideological factor of this case.  It points out that when content is made, regardless of who is the maker, there is a copyright on it, and the responsibility falls on the creator to whether or not it should be legal for the video to be hosted online.  The hosting service provider, in this case YouTube, does not need to make this distinction.

The earth-shattering stuff comes later on. Google begins describing a very systematic and sophisticated process used by Viacom to enhance the problem of pirated videos:

“For years, Viacom continuously and secretly uploaded its content to YouTube, even while publicly complaining about its presence there. It hired no fewer than 18 different marketing agencies to upload its content to the site. It deliberately “roughed up” the videos to make them look stolen or leaked. It opened YouTube accounts using phony email addresses. It even sent employees to Kinko’s to upload clips from computers that couldn’t be traced to Viacom. And in an effort to promote its own shows, as a matter of company policy Viacom routinely left up clips from shows that had been uploaded to YouTube by ordinary users. Executives as high up as the president of Comedy Central and the head of MTV Networks felt “very strongly” that clips from shows like The Daily Show and The Colbert Report should remain on YouTube.”

Already, these are pretty steep accusations which question Viacom’s rationale regarding this whole case.  It gets even worse when Viacom suddenly decided to demand YouTube remove videos en masse, only to ask for some of them to be reposted.  The situation is best summed up with line: “In fact, some of the very clips that Viacom is suing us over were actually uploaded by Viacom itself.”  If Google can show these allegations to be true, then Viacom’s entire case might be in the trash.

Via DailyTech

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