Jun 27 2010

Competion between Google Chrome OS and Microsoft Windows Heats Up

Google and Dell are in communication about Google Chrome OS and the future it plays in computing and possible installation of Google Chrome OS on a Dell netbook. Dell realizes that Chrome OS could very well offer stiff competition to Microsoft Windows and working with Google could benefit them in the next couple years as changes come to the industry.

There has been no official announcement from Dell or Google about a deal but “talks” are underway. If an agreement is reached Dell would be the third manufacturer to build a future netbook with Chrome OS. The other computer manufacturers that plan on releasing netbooks or other computers with Chrome OS are Acer and HP.

Jun 8 2010

Acer revealed netbook with Google Chrome OS

At Computex, Acer showed off their first netbook run on Google Chrome OS.  Most analysts agree that while Acer may be the first company showcasing such a netbook, other companies will soon follow suite due to the strength and flexibility of Google Chrome OS and also because Acer is not the only company to have struck a partnership with Google. Which company will be next?

Via SEOPositive

May 25 2010

Google Enthusiasts Must Wait Longer for Chrome

Google has brought us a variety of wonders and many of their innovations synergize perfectly together to create an altogether smooth experience. One thing people are anticipating greatly is the release of Google’s Chrome OS. The Chrome OS will be intended only for netbooks, as it is a simple browser-based operating system that doesn’t demand much processing power.  Companies such as Acer are working with Google to release netbooks with the OS as soon as possible, and it is rumored that they could be releasing one as soon as June. This rumor however was denied by Acer.

Google has a lot on their plate, as Android’s success is gaining momentum. Google will need to keep its focused balanced in order for both Chrome and Android to do their best. The key for Chrome will be the apps that it will have available for the users, thus Google is focusing on having an app store up and running.

It also must be noted that Computex is just around the bend and unfortunately one thing spectators should not expect to see is the Chrome OS.  It is likely then that consumers will just have to wait until the fall to see the Chrome OS.

Via Wired

May 18 2010

Rumor Denied: No Acer Chrome OS Netbook at Computex 2010

A few days ago, there was a rumor that Acer would be releasing a Chrome OS-based netbook at the upcoming Computex 2010 showcase.  Unfortunately, this rumor turns out to be just that — a rumor.  Recently, Acer has officially said that it will not be releasing such a device at Computex 2010.

Furthermore, Acer has announced that they will not be releasing any Chrome OS-based devices.  Don’t worry though, we’ll keep you posted when we hear any other juicy rumors.

Via I4U.

May 17 2010

Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 May Feature Chrome Instead of Firefox

At the most recent Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS), part of the discussion revolved around the changes that would be coming to the default applications released with the Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 software package.

One item on the list of changes is in regards to the default browser that comes with the Ubuntu software.  Instead of using Mozilla Firefox as the default web browser, Google Chrome might serve as its replacement.  Whether or not this change will happen will depend on if there is enough storage space available.

The proposition is that Chromium will be used until the software’s Alpha 3 stage, at which point further decisions regarding which will be the default browser as part of Ubuntu Netbook Edition (UNE) will be announced.

Via UbuntuHQ.

May 14 2010

First Chrome OS Device to be an Acer Netbook

In a couple weeks — two to be exact — Taiwanese computer manufacturer Acer is rumored to be launching netbooks (and possibly other tech devices) that run on the Google Chrome OS.  The official display will take place at the Computex Taipei Show that will be held from June 1 to June 5.

It’s still uncertain what other devices the Google Chrome OS will be featured in, but Google has mentioned that smartbooks and tablets running ARM processors would be likely vehicles.  There has recently been rumors that Samsung is developing ARM-based smartbooks running Chrome.

Using an OS other than Google Android for netbooks is a good idea.  The Android OS is better suited for tablets and cell phones.  Google originally planned to release the Chrome operating system during the second half of 2010.  The rumored Acer Chrome OS-based netbook is expected to launch in June, so that’s just perfect.

Via VentureBeat and CoolTechZone.

May 13 2010

First Chrome OS Device to be Released

The first device running Chrome OS, the open source operating system by Google, is supposed to be introduced by Acer in two weeks, according to multiple sources.

Acer is supposed to show off its new device at Computex Taipei, a yearly computer and electronics show that opens on June 1. Chrome OS was designed for netbooks, smartbooks, and tablets. Acer has said previously that it would have a Chrome OS netbook ready by the middle of 2010. There currently is no word about what the device is going to be.

Other netbook manufacturers have expressed interest in working with Chrome OS, including Dell, though it said that it was still evaluating Chrome OS.

What is unclear right now is the relationship between Chrome OS and Android. Android is intended for mobile devices, like smartphones, but some companies have expressed interest in using it on tablets as well. Google co-founder Sergey Brin says that the two will eventually merge.

Via CNET, image via Google.

Mar 20 2010

Google Announces ANGLE For Chrome

HTML 5 has exciting prospects for web applications.  It will hopefully result in the end of plug-ins, like Flash, and allow for a more universal standard across the internet.  One possibility would to be able to have 3D graphics in web pages.  The result could be high-end games directly available on web pages, not suffering from the performance load caused by Flash.

This isn’t just hypothetical stuff; the Mozilla Foundation along with Opera, Apple, and Chrome are all working to make this real with WebGL, a JavaScript library which allows for 3D rendering.  The only problem is it requires OpenGL support, something which is lacking on many Windows PCs.  So Google has announced its plans for ANGLE,  a “cross-platform web standard for accessing low-level 3D graphics hardware”.  Basically, it’s a way for Chrome to use Direct3D in place of OpenGL on Windows machines.

It is interesting to note that this announcement comes on the heels of Microsoft’s release of its new IE9 platform, which introduces HTML 5 and Direct2D hardware rendering.  It showed off some very impressive SVG based demos.  Google is taking the Microsoft threat very seriously, and has an added stake due to its browser based OS, Chrome OS.

Via Gizmodo

Feb 14 2010

Samsung Confirms Chrome OS Netbook

Samsung’s Phil Newton has confirmed the company is currently developing a netbook  that will run on Google’s Chrome OS. The netbook will be similar to the N210 netbook, and will be released as soon as later this year, or early in 2011. Specifications for the new device are largely unknown, but so far we know that the netbook will have a 12 hour battery life, 3G and wireless connectivity, a 10.1″ screen with LED backlighting, 2 GB RAM, and at least 64 GB of storage.  It is likely that the device will run a 1.5GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor.

Via Engadget

Feb 3 2010

iPad Rival: Google Chrome OS Tablet Under Development

Google recently published designs for a Chrome OS tablet that would compete directly with Apple’s newly released iPad. The tablet is still under development, but  pictures on Chromium.org give us an idea of what the hardware might look like, and how users might interact with it. Possible features include a 5 to 10 inch screen, on-screen keyboard, and multi-touch capability.

A video demonstrating how users would interact with the tablet is also available for download here.

The tablet is not the first of Google products that aim to rival Apple devices. The Nexus One was launched after the iPhone, and the Chrome OS itself competes with other operating systems –  not just Apple’s, but Microsoft’s as well.

Gartner analyst Robin Simpson says that, while it is debatable whether Google or Apple hardware is superior in quality, Apple definitely has the upper hand in terms of giving users better and easier access to content developed by independent third parties. Google seems to be making small steps in achieving a similar “ecosystem” by considering putting Chrome OS onto other devices, not just netbooks.

Via SMH, image via Wired.

Image via Wired.

Jan 26 2010

MSI’s Dual-Screen Tablet Netbook Could Run The Google Chrome OS

Word on the net says that MSI’s much-anticipated dual-monitor netbook, first seen at CES 2010, will be making an appearance on store shelves within a few months.

The netbook packs two 10″ monitors, one of which can be used as a keyboard with haptic feedback. While initial expectations were that MSI’s dual-screen netbook would run Windows 7, an interview with LaptopMag reveals that it could actually end up running the Google Chrome OS.

MSI says it will launch the netbook with 4.5 hours of battery life and e-reader capabilities. They may also add in a 7″ version of the tablet netbook by the time the original is released in Q3 or Q4.

As can be expected, info on pricing is not yet available, but I’m sure MSI will be doing its best to get the word out once a few more months go by.

Via I4U, image via Engadget.

Jan 26 2010

Acer To Deliver New eReader, App Store, and Chrome OS Netbook

Acer Logo

Acer, already the second largest computer maker in the world, has ambitious plans for the future. According to Bloomberg, Acer is tossing its hat into the already over-saturated yet underdeveloped market of eReaders, facing off with the likes of Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Sony, and others. No specifics have been announced other than it will have a 6-inch, monochrome (assume E-Ink) screen and ship in Europe.

More surprisingly, Acer is announcing an online apps store. Jim Wong, president of the Acer IT product division, has stated it would contain hundreds of applications, “otherwise you can’t call it an app store.” It will likely be a cross-platform marketplace for Android, Windows Mobile, and ChromeOS.

However, Acer’s most stunning announcement is the fact it has announced plans to rush forward with a ChromeOS netbook to provide a “a change to the Microsoft-Intel environment,” according to Wong. The mention of Intel hints that this new product line might be ARM powered as an alternative to the standard Atom on-board most mainstream netbooks. Acer plans to release the netbook sometime around Q3 2010, on schedule with Google’s release date for ChromeOS.

Via Bloomberg, image via Wikipedia.

Jan 3 2010

Google Chrome Surpasses Safari

Google’s browser Chrome, as of today, now holds 4.63% of the browser market, meaning that is has finally surpassed Apple’s Safari. This gain is attributed to the release of Mac and Linux versions of the browser. Safari has stayed relatively static, losing a miniscule 0.15%.

Microsoft’s Internet Explorer was the biggest loser this past month. It lost one percentage point, bringing its share down to 62.7%. Some people are predicting that if this trend continues, Internet Explorer will have under half of the browser market in six months.

Google is still continuing to improve Chrome. It released an extension today (currently only for Windows) that allows one to go to similar pages from the browser itself. More and more people may become dissatisfied with Internet Explorer and switch to Chrome, Safari, or Firefox (or another browser), which are, in my opinion, better alternatives to Microsoft’s product.

Via Computerworld.

Dec 28 2009

How Jolicloud Plans To Compete With The Google Chrome OS

Jolicloud has racked up $4.2 million in venture capital, and a lot of hopes are riding on its success. But how will it look once Google’s Chrome OS hits the netbook world?

Tariq Krim, the operating system’s mastermind, says he doesn’t know for sure how everything will play out but knows Jolicloud will be able to compete. While Google will rely mostly or entirely on Google Apps for the Chrome OS, Jolicloud will be making use of third-party partner services like Dropbox to customize the user experience.

Furthermore, Jolicloud netbooks will be able to run high definition video, which is hard to do on netbook browsers today. Chrome OS will be based mostly in the cloud, but with Jolicloud users will be able to store files locally and then sync with the cloud at their discretion.

Even so, Jolicloud doesn’t have the market in the bag just yet. Krim says that hardware is becoming less and less important, and consumers’ rising spending on cloud services could lead to unanticipated restructurings of the tech industry. In other words – we’re going to have to wait and see how it plays out for Jolicloud.

Via The Washington Post.

Dec 9 2009

Chrome Betas for Mac and Linux

Google has answered Mac and Linux user’s prayers this Tuesday by announcing that it has made betas for Chrome that will be compatible with both OSes. These are not final perfected versions of Chrome, but due to the open-source nature of Chrome they should quickly grow to become bigger and better.  Mac OS X 10.5 or later is necessary for the Chrome’s Mac beta, while the Linux beta runs on Gnome and KDE.

Chrome delivers ultra high-speed web browsing with loads of cool features. Now Mac and Linux users have a chance to judge for themselves if they will abandon their current reliable browsers for  this lightning speed (but possibly quirk-riddled) creation.

Via WebMonkey.

Dec 7 2009

Dell Plays Around With Chrome OS

Dell engineers have been having some fun with the new operating system that Google recently released to the public, as the massive open source project was released in its preliminary form to developers just a week ago. One Dell tech strategist has already mentioned that he and some of his colleagues want to get Chromium OS running on a test Dell  Mini 10v netbook.

Google intends to release Chrome OS next year as a lightweight operating system for netbooks. While they have not revealed their marketing strategy, they let everyone know they will be working with hardware partners from the netbook world. A Google spokesman refused to comment on whether or not Dell would be one of those hardware partners, but because Chrome OS is open source, we can expect a whole host of hardware companies to be interested in working with Google on Chrome.

Via Information Week.

Dec 2 2009

Acer Will Have The First Chrome Netbook

Acer says it will be the first PC maker to get a Chrome netbook on the market.

The news was announced in Chairman J.T. Wang’s recent interview with Digitimes, in which the Chairman stated that he was “confident” Acer would be the first.

The announcement shouldn’t be tremendously surprising – Acer is one of the only manufacturers with an Android netbook on the market, so it makes sense that it would use this partnership with Google to jump into the Chrome space ASAP. We should expect Acer’s Chrome netbook by mid-2012.

The world’s second-largest PC maker has designs on being the first to offer a Chrome OS Netbook. However, this new machine’s hardware shouldn’t just be more of the same – Google says new Chrome netbooks will have bigger keyboards and screens, SSDs, 802.11(n) Wi-Fi and x86 or ARM processors.

Via CNet.


Dec 1 2009

Google Chrome OS Plays Music On The Cloud With Lala

The netbook world has been eagerly anticipating the Google Chromium OS since its initial announcement just a few months back, and Dell has already released a beta for those of us too impatient for the real thing. However, the work isn’t over; we could be getting a number of unanticipated but welcome features come the official release.

A recent demo displays the Chromium UI with a user accessing music playback application Lala. Google already uses Lala pop-up windows to play music through Lala in its search engine, and hopes to implement this as an attraction to prospective Chromium netbook buyers.

Lala sells streamable songs for 10 cents each and hosts users’ old music collections in the cloud. This will allow owners to get their music from anywhere with internet access without lugging around gigs of data, something netbook lovers in particular tend to appreciate.

And even if you don’t have internet access, Lala says its upcoming iPhone application will keep the last few hundred songs you’ve listened to on tab so you can play them without the internet. This could be a welcome addition to Chrome as well.

Anyway, here’s the demo:

Via Wired.

Nov 30 2009

Netbook and Laptop Compatibility Check for Google Chrome OS

The Google Chrome operating system isn’t pre-installed on netbooks just yet, but if you’re interested, below are some netbooks that have been “officially” tested and that claim to be compatible with the software. On these netbooks, you can assume that everything works, including 802.11 Wi-Fi, Ethernet, the touchpad, and the suspend/resume functions.

*These netbooks ship with both Atheros and Broadcom 802.11 wireless adapters. The Atheros adapter works out-of-the-box with the Chrome operating system, but the Broadcom adapter does not.

Via Google.

Nov 27 2009

Dell Provides Free and Easy Google Chrome OS Download for Its Inspiron Mini 10v Netbook

The Chrome OS doesn’t yet provide anything that the Chrome web browser doesn’t, but we thought we’d share the procedure for downloading it onto your Dell Inspiron Mini 10v netbook anyway. First, grab yourself a USB drive that’s 8 GB or greater. (The actual download is roughly 7.5 GB.)

Essentially, the installation involves copying the Google Chrome OS image file onto your netbook. You’ll also need access to a computer that’s running Linux in order to turn the downloaded IMG file to a bootable file.

Technically, a Dell employee (nicknamed Doug A) came up with this entire process as he was testing out compiling a copy of the Google Chrome OS for himself after seeing it run on various netbooks last week. Doug A explains:

“To copy onto an USB key (8GB minimum), find another Linux machine and utilize the “dd” command to put the image onto the USB key. Example: dd if=ChromiumOS_Mini10v_Nov25.img of=/dev/sdb. In this example, /dev/sdb is my entire USB key… use “fdisk -l” to see how your USB key is named for your particular environment. Be careful to select your USB device (again, use fdisk -l to double verify and confirm the correct device filename) and not another device…”

The Google Chrome OS image file for the Dell Inspiron Mini 10v netbook is named ChromiumOS_Mini10v_Nov25.img and can be found here.

Via MobileComputerMag.


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